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  •         WELCOME
         to our Website




    Shown above are our wonderful parish priests.
    Father Ted Vitale, C.P. Non Resident Associate, and our pastor Rev. Msgr.Patrick K. Hambrough.

    We thank you for visiting our parish website.  We hope the information available on this site is helpful to you.  If you need additional information, please call us at 314.743.8600 someone will be more than happy to assist you.



    If you are interested in becoming Catholic we offer a Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults Program a.k.a RCIA.. If you have been away from the Church and are interested in returning we offer a program called Catholics Returning Home a.k.a. CRH. 

    St. Mark Parish is a Catholic community of faith.  Our desire is to build up the Kingdom of God by sharing our gifts of time, talent and treasure with our own parishioners and with those of the larger community.  We invite everyone to join us in our many liturgical services, outreach ministries and social events.

    To build our Catholic community as One Body in Christ, many of our parishioners – and many others in the area around us – get involved in some of our many parish organizations.  These ministries provide opportunities to experience Christian learning, growth and community-building.  They focus on many areas, including:  Spiritual and Liturgical; Administrative; Christian Formation and Education; Youth; Community/World Outreach and Service; Social Groups; and Sporting Teams. 

    Our Parish Catholic School and Parish School of Religion (PSR) strive to educate our youth and to assist in their faith formation as Catholics. 

    We welcome you to St. Mark’s Parish and we invite you to visit our very active and very, blessed faith- based  community.  We invite you to grow with us in faith and service.

  •      PARISH SCHOOL         OF RELIGION 2017


    Please click on Education and Faith Formation above and then on Parish School of Religion to the right. You will then be able to click the links necessary to register for PSR.


     
  •           ST. MARK 
    CATHOLIC   CHURCH


             WE'VE MOVED
    Effective August 5, 2017,  our new location is at 4220 Ripa Ave next to our school.
    Our Dedication Mass will be Saturday September 9, 5:00 PM


     
    St. Mark Church St. Mark School
    4220 Ripa Ave 4220 Ripa Ave
    St. Louis, MO 63125 St. Louis, MO 63125
    314.743.8600 314.743.8640
    314.743.8618 (fax) 314.743.8690 (fax)





     
  • Mass Times

    Sunday Masses: Sat. Evening: 5PM
     Sun. Morning: 7AM 9AM 11AM,


    Starting September 5, daily mass will be offered Monday through Friday at 6:30 AM and 8:00 AM. Saturday at 8:00 AM. Please note the time change of 8:00 to better accomodate the school schedule.



    Holy Day Masses:6:30AM, 9AM & 7PM (The Day of)

    We have Adoration after the 8:00 AM Mass until 9:00 PM every Tuesday.


    Even though our new address is 4220 Ripa Ave, correspondence should be addressed to 4200 Ripa Ave. 
     

  • The Sacrament of Reconciliation is available from 3:30-4:30PM on Saturdays or by appointment.  
     
  • Saint Crescentia Hoess

    Saint of the Day for April 6

    (October 20, 1682 – April 5, 1744)

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    Saint Crescentia Hoess’ Story

    Crescentia was born in 1682, the daughter of a poor weaver, in a little town near Augsburg. She spent play time praying in the parish church, assisted those even poorer than herself and had so mastered the truths of her religion that she was permitted to make her first Holy Communion at the t

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    Saint of the Day

    Saint Lorenzo Ruiz and Companions

    Saint of the Day
    for September 22

    (1600 – September 29 or 30, 1637)

    Saint Lorenzo Ruiz and Companions’ Story

    Lorenzo was born in Manila of a Chinese father and a Filipino mother, both Christians. Thus he learned Chinese and Tagalog from them, and Spanish from the Dominicans whom he served as altar boy and sacristan. He became a professional calligrapher, transcribing documents in beautiful penmanship. He was a full member of the Confraternity of the Holy Rosary under Dominican auspices. He married and had two sons and a daughter.

    Lorenzo’s life took an abrupt turn when he was accused of murder. Nothing further is known except the statement of two Dominicans that “he was sought by the authorities on account of a homicide to which he was present or which was attributed to him.”

    At that time, three Dominican priests, Antonio Gonzalez, Guillermo Courtet, and Miguel de Aozaraza, were about to sail to Japan in spite of a violent persecution there. With them was a Japanese priest, Vicente Shiwozuka de la Cruz, and a layman named Lazaro, a leper. Lorenzo, having taken asylum with them, was allowed to accompany them. But only when they were at sea did he learn that they were going to Japan.

    They landed at Okinawa. Lorenzo could have gone on to Formosa, but, he reported, “I decided to stay with the Fathers, because the Spaniards would hang me there.” In Japan they were soon found out, arrested, and taken to Nagasaki. The site of wholesale bloodshed when the atomic bomb was dropped had known tragedy before. The 50,000 Catholics who once lived there were dispersed or killed by persecution.

    They were subjected to an unspeakable kind of torture: After huge quantities of water were forced down their throats, they were made to lie down. Long boards were placed on their stomachs and guards then stepped on the ends of the boards, forcing the water to spurt violently from mouth, nose and ears.

    The superior, Fr. Gonzalez, died after some days. Both Fr. Shiwozuka and Lazaro broke under torture, which included the insertion of bamboo needles under their fingernails. But both were brought back to courage by their companions.

    In Lorenzo’s moment of crisis, he asked the interpreter, “I would like to know if, by apostatizing, they will spare my life.” The interpreter was noncommittal, but in the ensuing hours Lorenzo felt his faith grow strong. He became bold, even audacious, with his interrogators.

    The five were put to death by being hanged upside down in pits. Boards fitted with semi-circular holes were fitted around their waists and stones put on top to increase the pressure. They were tightly bound, to slow circulation and prevent a speedy death. They were allowed to hang for three days. By that time Lorenzo and Lazaro were dead. Still alive, the three priests were then beheaded.

    In 1987, Pope John Paul II canonized these six and 10 others: Asians and Europeans, men and women, who spread the faith in the Philippines, Formosa, and Japan. Lorenzo Ruiz is the first canonized Filipino martyr.


    Reflection

    We ordinary Christians of today—how would we stand up in the circumstances these martyrs faced? We sympathize with the two who temporarily denied the faith. We understand Lorenzo’s terrible moment of temptation. But we see also the courage—inexplainable in human terms—which surged from their store of faith. Martyrdom, like ordinary life, is a miracle of grace.